The shift also helped sterling to recover 5 percent from lows around $1.40 last week. "Part of it is gradually more and more the risk from Brexit being removed, something that started last week when we saw the polls changing around," said Charles St-Arnaud, senior strategist and economist at Nomura Securities International in London. That bolstered the Australian and New Zealand dollar, St-Arnaud said, with the kiwi rising to its highest since June 11, 2015, and the Aussie touching its highest since May 3. "Being the highest-paying currencies in the developed world, they're gaining quite a

...